Sep 172014
 

With autumn right around the corner, I have been ramping up my knitting, in anticipation of adding more pieces to my fall and winter wardrobe.  Today, I’m excited to show you a knitting pattern that I finished a while ago.  This is the Ebb & Flow cardigan.  I started sketching out the idea for this cardigan in January when I was on a family vacation at the Florida coast, where I watched the sun rise over the rolling waves of the ocean each and every morning.  That was a view I could not get enough of!  Back home, far from the ocean and surrounded by parched earth, I miss those ocean waves.  I love the desert, but places that receive regular rainfall seem almost exotic to me.  This is my ode to those beautiful rolling ocean waves.

IMGP9385

Here is my reminder of what the ocean at sunrise even looks like.   Sigh…

1555514_10151898899959849_751763143_n

While basic, this cardigan shape is one of my favorites.  It’s simple, effortless (doesn’t need any special styling), and flattering.  I prefer lightweight cardigans over any other heavier weight sweater because they are easier to layer with if it is particularly cold but can also be plenty warm on their own if it is not too cold.

And while the shape might be basic, I’m continually drawn to interesting details.  Ebb & Flow features a simple feather & fan lace pattern along the center fronts, made more eye-catching with gradient stripes, which are worked seamlessly with the body using a simple intarsia twist.

IMGP9380

The cardigan is worked seamlessly from the bottom-up, starting with a provisional cast on.  After the main body and sleeves of the cardigan are completed, the ribbing is worked all around, with mitered corners, and finished with applied i-cord and i-cord buttonloops.  The pattern is sized from 30” / 76 cm to 60” / 152 cm bust, with sizing increments every 2” / 5 cm and waist shaping to ensure a flattering fit.

IMGP9381

I worked this sample using Knit Picks Palette, with Pool as the main color, and Bluebell and Jay for the contrasting colors.  I tend to be overly excited about playing with color and this sweater provides great opportunities for color play.  This version of the sweater has a rather bold color combination, but I am daydreaming of knitting up a more muted one, with perhaps white or light grey as the main color and a warm gradient of soft reds up the front.  The colors for the gradients don’t require much yarn, so a person could even dive into their remnants!

materials

Find Ebb & Flow on Ravelry

IMGP9382

Aug 072014
 

Knit Picks has recently announced the released of their fall collection of knitting patterns, Burnished.  The collection includes patterns from several independent designers for sweaters and accessories that are both visually stunning and sure to provide warmth as we transition into the cooler seasons of fall and winter.  I am particularly excited about this collection because I have a pattern included!

Meet Umbra & Penumbra.

Umbra & Penumbra is a top-down pullover exploring the effects of light and dark in an “ombré” style. Typically used to describe celestial shadows (such as solar eclipses), umbra and penumbra refer to two parts of a shadow and may also be used to describe levels of darkness.  The umbra is the darkest part of the shadow and the penumbra is the lightest part of the shadow.  In an umbra, an observer would experience a total eclipse whereas in a penumbra they would experience a partial eclipse.

Featuring a mock turtleneck, Umbra & Penumbra is worked seamlessly in a slip-stitch pattern, using the effects of color dominance to showcase color gradients.  In using two colors for each stripe of the slip-stitch pattern, one color will be dominant (or, more pronounced) and by alternating which yarn is dominant, more color gradients may be achieved in subsequent stripes.

Below is a detailed photo of the slip-stitch pattern and color gradients.  There are six stripes of color gradients visible below, but only 3 colors of yarn were used (just in this bottom half of the sweater).  If you look closely, you can see that different colors are dominant in each stripe.

Here is another detail of the patterning as well as the neckline and fit across the yoke.

 

This pattern would be appropriate for an adventurous beginner or intermediate level knitter.  Techniques include slip stitches, increases and decreases, and knitting in the round.  Short rows are worked at the yoke and shaping at the waist to create a better fit.  The slip-stitch pattern produces a stretchy fabric that is well-suited to both a relaxed fit and a more fitted fit.  The model in these photos is wearing the sweater with 2″ of positive ease, but zero ease or a bit of negative ease would flatter as well, depending on the preference of the wearer.

For fit comparisons, below has 2″ of positive ease.

And here is the version that I worked, with 1″ of negative ease.

Back view, 1″ of negative ease.

(As a side note, this was actually my prototype and includes 2 additional colors that I decided to remove because I felt the additional colors didn’t provide any benefit and were more cumbersome to stay organized).

The pattern calls for six colors of yarn, resulting in 16 gradient stripes.  Combining a sport weight yarn and the slip-stitch pattern, the fabric is lofty without being bulky or dense.  Wool of the Andes is a great workhorse yarn that will keep you warm without needing special treatment.  As a pullover, Umbra & Penumbra would be an ideal sweater for a fall hiking and camping trip as well as a cozy fireside sweater.

Another advantage of Wool of the Andes is that it comes in a wide variety of colorways.  If brown isn’t your favorite color, there are many alternatives!  I worked a second version in a selection of purple colorways.

(From top to bottom: White (25269), Haze Heather (25657), Sprinkle Heather (25659), Amethyst Heather (25304), Blackberry (25300), and Coal (25268)).

Below are some ideas for colorways I might use if I were to knit either a green version or a blue version.  The basic idea for finding color combination would be to start and end the sweater with white and coal, and then find four additional colors to create the gradients from light to dark.

 

Umbra & Penumbra is sized from 32″ – 64″ bust:  32 (35.25, 40.25, 43.5, 47.25, 51.75, 55.75, 60.25, 64)”.

Needles: US 5 (3.75mm) 24″ or longer circular needle and set of DPNs, or size to achieve gauge.

Gauge: 25 sts and 48 rows = 4″ over slip-stitch pattern worked in the round.

Yarn: Knit Picks Wool of the Andes Sport (100% Peruvian Highland Wool, 137 yards / 50 g)

  • White (25269) – 1 (1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2) balls
  • Oyster Heather (25276) – 3 (3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5) balls
  • Camel Heather (25277) – 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5) balls
  • Chestnut (25273) - 3 (3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5) balls
  • Fedora (25272) – 3 (3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4) balls
  • Coal (25268) – 3 (3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4) balls

Lastly, but most definitely not leastly, I would like to give a HUGE thank you to Knit Picks and their extraordinarily talented team for their work on this pattern collection.  When I first saw the photographs they took of my sweater design as well as the finished book, I was BLOWN AWAY.

Burnished and Umbra & Penumbra are both available from Knit Picks.

On Ravelry, find them at: