Jul 072008
 

First and foremost, I am currently participating in my very first knitalong. Those of you knon-knitters out there may ask, “What is a knitalong?” In a nutshell, it is when one knits along with others. This particular knitalong is themed after the Tour de France and everyone is assigned to teams that correspond to the actual teams in the Tour. I, for example, have been assigned to Team Silence-Lotto, which obliges me to root for one of the more attractive riders – – Go Robbie! In addition, the knitters are grouped into classifications to determine their knitting project. One of the organizers has developed some nice artwork for the knitters to display their classification (see below). I have the polka dot jersey classification, which stipulates that I must do a challenging knitting project involving a new skill.

For my project, I have chosen the Swallotail Shawl, which was to be an ode to the interplay between bicycle and rider, with each yarn over representing the ticking over of another pedal stroke (or something cheesey like that). Lace (beyond a four row repeat) is very challenging for me. On Saturday, I cast on using Classic Elite Silky Alpaca lace yarn. It’s caused me a number of headaches – – I’ve cast on, ripped out, re-cast on many many times. I even tried another (thicker) yarn, thinking it was the yarn’s fault (not mine). Alas, it was not the yarn’s fault. I even contemplated casting on an entirely different project. For me, this project has become my own personal Alpe d’Huez. blech.

In other knews, I have completed my first thrift store sweater recycling. From Goodwill, I located this XL-size Alfani sweater for $2.50. The fiber content is nothing spectacular, a cotton-nylon blend, but it was mostly for practice. For anyone who is interested in this process, I would HIGHLY recommend a thorough reading of the online tutorial. For me, this was good practice – – I experienced a bit of frustration that could have been avoided, had I engaged in a more thorough reading of the tutorial. But there was considerable learning involved and I am confident that this will be a good method for me to continue with my knitting hobby without breaking the bank. Below are photos depicting the sweater sections, unraveling the sweater onto my new swift, the ramen-noddley yarn before dunking it into water, hanging the yarn with some weight to get the kinks out, and finally, my three ‘cakes’ of yarn ready for knitting! I would have four cakes, but one ramen-noddley yarn section became much too tangled and I was forced to throw it away in complete irritation (see above, thorough reading of the online tutorial to avoid aggravation).

In other FOs, I recently finished my Logan River Scarf knit with the glorious Noro Silk Garden. Silk Garden is lovely. I was delighted to locate three skeins in the same colorway that had somewhat subdued colors.

And finally, I have fixed the error in my Ruffled Jacket. Josh was kind enough to take this very awesome photo of it.

  3 Responses to “~ knews ~”

  1. Hi!
    I’m Melanie from your Silence Lotto team!
    Your projects are so lovely…do you like finishing (I think I mean like the sewing of seams, etc?) Cause boy, my finished items never look as nice as yours!
    Go team!

  2. Oh my, thank you! Actually, I hate finishing and I knit most of my projects seamlessly, which has had mixed results – – but affords me plenty of learning opportunities.

  3. I am having ‘mountainous’ troubles of my own with my shawl choice. I’ve knitted and ripped so many times, I’ve lost count! Hang in there, I’m sure we’ll come out fine in the end. Now if only our team was doing as well….

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